Posts Tagged ‘Carcare’

A Clean Mass Air Flow Sensor Restores Lost MPG and Horsepower

January 10, 2017

With the ever-rising costs of fuel, who can afford to waste even one single drop? But it’s happening to you right now if your vehicle has a dirty mass air flow (MAF) sensor.

An MAF sensor constantly measures the amount and density of the air entering the engine so the computer knows how much gasoline to inject into each cylinder. Located after the air filter and ahead of the throttle body, the MAF sensor uses a heated wire (hotwire) or flat film element to measure airflow.

The MAF sensor works by holding the operating temperature of the hotwire at a constant temperature. As air moves over the hotwire, the wire will cool down. More air running across the wire requires more electrical current to keep the hotwire heated.

A vehicle’s computer depends on extremely accurate measurements of air mass and density from the MAF sensor to help calculate everything from the amount of fuel needed to run the engine efficiently (without excessive emissions) to transmission shift points and ignition timing.

If there’s a film or dirt on the hotwire it will insulate it and slow the communication between the MAF sensor and the computer; a situation that can directly cause drivability issues, excessive emissions and poor fuel economy resulting in fewer MPG than your vehicle is meant to reach.

Mass air flow sensors can get dirty in a number of ways. Pollen, dust particles and soot can build up and burn onto on the hotwire of the mass air flow sensor causing incorrect measurements of air flow and density. This can lead to hesitation, sputtering, hard starting, stalling, excess emissions and power loss.

Oil can also build up on the hotwire, caused by excessive blow-by from internal engine wear or, more often, where an aftermarket air filter that requires oil is fitted to the vehicle. Sometimes a consumer will over oil these air filters and the oil will travel directly from the filter onto the MAF sensor leading to malfunction.

Recognizing the need for a product to safely clean fragile mass air flow sensors, CRC Industries, manufacturer of Brakleen® Brake Parts Cleaner and an industry leader in automotive maintenance chemicals, developed CRC Mass Air Flow Sensor Cleaner, the FIRST cleaner specifically designed for the MAF sensor. Julie Williams, Marketing Manager for CRC, warns: “DO NOT use carburetor or brake parts cleaners to clean MAF sensors. Aggressive chemicals can degrade the plastic housing and sensitive electronics of the MAF sensor leading to malfunction.”

Cleaning your MAF sensor is easy and should take about 10 minutes. First, turn off your vehicle and locate the MAF sensor between the air box and throttle body. Unplug the MAF sensor wire harness and remove the MAF sensor housing. Typically a screwdriver will work, but you may need a TORX® security bit for some models. Place a shop towel under your MAF sensor to catch any run-off. With the straw attached, apply 10-15 sprays of CRC MAF Sensor Cleaner onto the hot-wires, but be sure the hot-wires do not come in contact with the straw or any other object.

Spray all sides of the MAF sensor and clean all wires and connectors. Finally, reassemble the MAF sensor and allow it to dry thoroughly before restarting the engine. This would be a great time to clean or change your air filter, too.

The CRC plastic-safe formula is extremely effective and proven to renew MPG and up to 10 horsepower with dynamometer proven results. You’ll get increased horsepower, better fuel economy (more MPG), improved air/fuel ratio, fewer emissions and a smoother running engine when you clean with CRC Mass Air Flow Sensor Cleaner.

Do-It-Yourselfers can find CRC Mass Air Flow Sensor Cleaner at their favorite auto parts store. Or, schedule an appointment with your mechanic and ask him to clean your MAF sensor using CRC MAF Sensor Cleaner, the only product safe for cleaning MAF sensors and backed by proven results. Visit http://www.crcindustries.com for more details.

Caring for Your Car During Summer

June 30, 2015

Summer can be tough on cars, especially during high temperatures when heat can destroy batteries and stress the cooling system and tires. As a precaution, these vehicle components should be checked periodically during summer to help avoid breakdowns and car problems, according to the Car Care Council.

Excessive heat and overcharging shorten the life of a battery. Heat causes battery fluid to evaporate, which then damages the internal structure of the battery. A malfunctioning component in the charging system, usually the voltage regulator, allows too high a charging rate, which will eventually destroy a battery.To get the most life out of a battery, the council recommends having the electrical system checked to make sure it is charging at the correct rate. If your car’s battery is the type that needs to be topped off, check it often, especially in hot weather and add distilled water if necessary. Keep the top of the battery clean. Dirt can become a conductor, which drains battery power. If corrosion accumulates on battery terminals, it becomes an insulator and inhibits the current flow.

The cooling system also works harder during hot temperatures to prevent overheating of the engine. To keep the cooling system working effectively, the coolant and distilled water mixture for a vehicle’s radiator should be 50:50. As a reminder, never open a hot radiator cap when checking the coolant level in the reservoir.As a rule of thumb, the coolant should be changed annually on most vehicles. This will keep the cooling system fresh and clean inside, which helps prevent corrosion and assures that the coolant has the proper boiling point and protection. A pressure test, thermostat test, a cooling fan test and a visual inspection for leaks and corrosion should also be done annually. Hoses and drive belts should be checked for cracks, bulges or frayed edges.The radiator should be kept clean by periodically using a garden hose and a soft brush to carefully remove bugs, dirt and debris.

Tires also need special care in warmer weather as high temperatures put added stress on them. To maximize tire life and safety, check the tire condition and inflation pressure monthly, and have the tires rotated every 6,000 miles. Summer heat will cause the pressure within a tire to rise, therefore, it’s important to check the pressure when tires are cold. The owner’s manual includes the recommended air pressure for your vehicle’s tires.

“It takes very little time and money to make sure your car runs properly during summer, and although breakdowns happen, they can definitely be minimized by taking a few extra preventive maintenance steps,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council.

The council reminds motorists that the vehicle’s exterior also can be damaged by sunlight, UV radiation, acid rain, salt, dirt and air pollution. To protect the paint and finish, vehicles should be washed weekly and waxed every six months.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For a copy of the council’s Car Care Guide or for more information, visit http://www.carcare.org.

Daylight Savings Time is This Weekend, Time to Change Your Wiper Blades

March 3, 2015

Many drivers procrastinate when it comes to changing their wiper blades for them, it’s just not a priority. But the American Optometric Association reports that 90 percent of driving decisions are based on visibility. With that statistic in mind, It is critical it is to change wiper blades regularly.

Installing a new pair will immediately improve the level of visibility and control – a benefit for both the driver and for those sharing the road. It is recommended that wiper blades or refills be changed every six months to maintain maximum driving safety.

As an easy reminder, wipers can be changed at the same time that clocks are reset during the beginning and end of daylight savings time. It’s also a good idea to visually inspect wipers every few months, especially if they are exposed to severe weather conditions on a regular basis

Buy a set of wiper blades this weekend and install them yourself. It takes only a few minutes, and simple instructions are right on the box.

Before you begin, here are two suggestions:

• You can make the wiper blade more accessible by stopping it in the most convenient location with the ignition key. Don’t use the wiper on-off switch, as it causes the wipers to stop in their parked position.

• Look for replacement rubber squeegees to avoid the cost of buying the entire blade and holder. They’re usually easily installed and can restore wiping action, as long as the rest of the components are OK.

15 percent of the vehicles passing through check lanes during National Car Care Month failed because of worn windshield wiper blades. That’s reason enough to learn to do it yourself.

The No-Fail Valentine’s Day Gift

February 11, 2015

Giving the gift of tender loving care to one’s vehicle will pay off in terms of dependability and performance this Valentine’s Day, according to the Car Care Council.

“When that gift translates into maintenance, motorists can expect a positive and tangible response from their vehicle in terms of dependability and performance,” said Rich White of the Car Care Council.

On the other side of the coin, consider how the car might respond if its owner had been “cheating” on it. Cheating might refer to postponing maintenance or repairs. Cheating on your vehicle may leave you stranded en route to that romantic Valentine’s Day dinner.

As with human relationships, car care is not just for special occasions and holidays. The best preventative measure is following the ongoing maintenance schedule outlined in the owner’s manual. This care helps minimize wear and catch little problems before they become big ones.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” campaign, educating consumers about the benefits of regular vehicle maintenance and repair. For more information visit http://www.carcare.org.

Vehicle Safety Items Make Perfect Holiday Gifts

December 17, 2014

It’s crunch time and if you’re still struggling with what to give a loved one, family member or friend this holiday season, the perfect gift can be an item related to vehicle safety. Tire pressure gauges, ice scrapers, emergency kits, windshield wipers or the new consumer Car Care Guide, published by the Car Care Council, are suitable items for any drivers on your list.

“These small and relatively inexpensive items play a big role in vehicle safety and reliability especially during winter driving when road conditions can be hazardous and unpredictable,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “They’re a perfect stocking stuffer or holiday gift that shows the drivers on your list that you truly care about them this holiday season.”

Low tire pressure and windshield wipers were among the top six items that had the highest failure rate during National Car Care Month check-up events. Tire pressure should be checked at least once a month as properly inflated tires are critical to the vehicle’s ride, handling, traction and safety. For optimum performance, wiper blades should be replaced every six months or when cracked, cut, torn, streaking or chattering.

An emergency road kit is something that can be easily compiled or purchased. A kit should include an ice scraper and snowbrush, jumper cables, flashlight, flares, blanket, candles/matches, bottled water and dry food snacks.

The council’s Car Care Guide is a glove-box size consumer booklet that presents automotive maintenance and repair in everyday language. Single copies of the guide are available at no cost on the Car Care Council Web site at http://www.carcare.org.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers.

Be Aware of Aggressive Drivers

December 4, 2014

Aggressive driving habits, such as tailgating, flashing headlights and unpredictable driving speeds can put motorists at risk for a collision.

“Aggressive drivers are not only a danger to themselves, they create hazards for other motorists and pedestrians,” says PPG’s CertifiedFirst® Network. “The actions of aggressive drivers can divert the attention of other motorists from their own driving; raising the likelihood a collision could occur.”

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration defines aggressive driving as operating a motor vehicle in a way that endangers or is likely to endanger persons or property, including: speeding, running a red light or stop sign, failure to yield the right of way and reckless driving. Generally, aggressive driving stems from frustration and ranges from the annoying – flashing headlights, and honking – to the dangerous – tailgating, running red lights, weaving in and out of lanes, or speeding.

Drivers between the ages of 18 and 25 have the highest aggressive driving tendency. Estimates are that one out of five accidents resulting in injury has a direct link to aggressive driving. (Sources: Monica Milla, “Aggression & Road Rage,” UNTRI Research Review. Scott Bowles and Paul Overberg, “Aggressive Driving: a Road Well-Traveled,” USA Today.

To avoid becoming an aggressive driver:

  • Be patient.
  • Don’t yell or gesture at other drivers.
  • Make safety a priority – don’t tailgate other drivers, and be sure to observe posted speed limits.
  • Budget enough time for your trip – beginning a drive with the stress of being late can limit your patience with other drivers.
  • Look for safe ways to relieve tension while driving – for example, find a type of music that is relaxing.
  • Avoid driving directly beside another vehicle for an extended time – be sure there is a traffic lane or berm open in case of an emergency.
  • Don’t take other drivers’ actions personally.

Avoid becoming the target of aggressive drivers by:

  • Using the left lane for passing only, this improves the orderly flow of traffic and can reduce driver irritation.
  • Resisting the urge to speed up or slow down when other drivers want to pass – maintain constant speed and let them by.
  • Using your turn signal BEFORE initiating turns or lane changes.
  • Being considerate – if the lane next to you is open, move over and allow other drivers room to merge onto the highway.

The CertifiedFirst® Network is a group of over 1900 independent and dealership-owned auto body repair shops that meet high standards of customer satisfaction and facility quality, verified by third-party evaluators. For more information on what to do in case of an accident or to learn more about the CertifiedFirst Network, visit http://www.certifiedfirst.com.

Is Your Battery Ready to Conquer Winter’s Frigid Temperatures?

November 18, 2014

Cold weather can play havoc with a vehicle’s battery, threatening starting and the ability to handle winter’s increased electrical loads.

“A conventional 12-volt battery maintains about 40 percent of its capacity at 0 degrees F, so it’s very important to make sure the vehicle’s battery is up to the task when the weather turns really cold. Most engines won’t start when cranking voltage drops too far below 12 volts, and a battery loses some of its available voltage and cold cranking amps (CCA) as it ages. So it’s a good idea to take precautions as the chill envelopes us,” said Andreas Tobler, Product Manager, Energy Systems for Bosch.

  • Tobler suggested these precautions to avoid cold weather battery problems:
  • Check all battery and starter connections. Make sure they are tight and cables are top quality and in good condition.
  • Make sure the alternator is operating at full capacity to keep the engine running and operate lights, windshield wipers and heater fan while keeping the battery charged. Replace it if questionable.
  • Have the battery tested to make sure it has sufficient capacity and is new enough to handle frigid temperature starting, heavy electrical demand. Install a fresh battery if needed.
  • If the battery charge is low, have it charged or use a modern portable battery charger to keep it in top form. An occasional charge can keep the battery ready,as well as revitalize an exhausted battery.

Batteries to Tame the Elements

Bosch, a global premium battery leader, provides a comprehensive automotive battery program for domestic, Asian and European passenger cars, light trucks and SUVs, with 97 percent coverage of vehicles on the road in the continental United States. This program offers quality batteries that provide a combination of cold-cranking amps (CCA), battery reserve capacity and long life, and includes the S3 value performance battery, the S4 quality performance battery, the S5 premium performance battery, and the S6 high performance AGM battery for the coldest and most demanding conditions.

The Bosch high performance S6 AGM (Absorbed Glass Mat) battery, for instance, is meant to conquer the coldest winter, and features:

  • 30 percent more deep cycle ability and vibration resistance than conventional batteries
  • Latest technology for start/stop applications
  • Sealed and 100 percent leak-proof in any position, also for passenger compartment use
  • 100 percent maintenance free under normal operating conditions
  • 3-year free replacement/pro rata warranty
  • Free roadside assistance

“Cold cranking amps (CCA) is the amount of current a battery can provide at 0°F (−18°C). The rating is defined as the current a lead-acid battery at that temperature can deliver for 30 seconds and maintain at least 1.2 volts per cell (7.2 volts for a 12-volt battery). In other words, CCA/cold cranking amps determine how much power is available to start the car on cold winter mornings,” Tobler said.

“Beat the frigid weather by making sure your vehicle’s battery is ready for it,” he said.

Happy Fall! Time to Think About Your Coolant.

September 11, 2014

It’s the beginning of fall, and time to consider your coolant.

This is a good time to think about your engine cooling system. Regular inspections and pressure tests of your cooling system are of utmost importance, as is good maintenance by following the vehicle manufacturer’s recommended coolant change intervals.

As time passes, the protective anti-corrosive additives in the antifreeze break down and lose their effectiveness. But antifreeze has two other very important jobs as well:

• It is used to decrease the temperature at which the coolant freezes.

• It is used to raise the temperature at which the coolant will begin to boil.

It is also very important that the proper ratio of water to antifreeze is always maintained. Unless specified otherwise by the vehicle manufacturer, the coolant in most vehicles should consist of a mixture of 50% water and 50% antifreeze before being added to the cooling system. This 50/50 solution not only prevents freezing, but also preserves proper cooling properties.

Also concerning the antifreeze to water mixture ratio: adding more antifreeze to the mix (once again, unless otherwise specified by the vehicle manufacturer) to increase its percentage in the mixture is not better. Generally speaking, after the ratio exceeds more than about 65% antifreeze to 35% water, freeze protection can actually diminish, but even worse, heat dissipation can radically decrease, since the water is the primary substance used for this purpose. Antifreeze itself actually has fairly poor heat transfer characteristics. Having too much antifreeze in the mixture can actually cause engine overheating.

When having your mobile A/C system professionally serviced, insist on proper repair procedures and quality replacement parts. Insist on recovery and recycling so that refrigerant can be reused and not released into the atmosphere.

You can E-mail us at macsworldwide@macsw.org

Is Your Vehicle Safe for Memorial Day Travel?

May 20, 2014

With the Memorial Day Holiday weekend upon us and the summer vacation season fast approaching; there is no better time to “Be Car Care Aware” about your vehicle. According to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA), an average of 13,000 Americans are killed between Memorial Day weekend and Labor Day. A portion of these deaths can be directly attributed to unperformed vehicle maintenance as each year neglected maintenance leads to over 2,600 deaths, nearly 100,000 disabling injuries and more than $2 billion in lost wages, medical expenses and property damage.

“Proper car care is important at all times, but is particularly critical during the holiday travel seasons,” says Rich White, executive director of the Car Care Council. “When vehicle maintenance is put off too long, you’re potentially putting your safety, as well as the safety of your passengers and other drivers, in jeopardy.”

With American drivers spending 11% more time on the road this year, according to a study from the Surface Transportation Policy Project, having a safe car and driving safely are both high priorities as we head into summer. Car trouble, usually due to neglected maintenance, brings an abrupt end to vacation plans and can also lead to dangerous results.

This scenario usually can be avoided with a pre-vacation inspection. This “physical” for your automobile should address the following systems:
•Cooling
•Braking
•Emission
•Steering/suspension
•Fuel
•Electrical and ignition

In addition, an evaluation of the following should be performed: engine performance, tires/wheels, A.C./heater/defroster, instruments/gages, windshield wipers, horns/lights/mirrors, seat belts and the car’s body, inside and out.

Not only can a pre-trip inspection help reduce chances of costly and possibly dangerous road trouble, it also provides an opportunity to have repairs made at home, with one’s own technician who knows the vehicle.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” campaign, educating consumers about the benefits of regular vehicle maintenance and repair. For more information and to download your free copy of the Service Interval Schedule, visit http://www.carcare.org.

CRC Reenergizes Lubricants and Penetrants Line with Enhanced Packaging and QR Code Technology

March 5, 2013

CRC Industries, manufacturer of CRC Brakleen® brake parts cleaner and an extensive arsenal of automotive maintenance repair products, has launched an enhanced look for its professional and DIY lubricants and penetrants.

The updated packaging is already hitting store shelves and repair shop bays. According to Dori Ahart, marketing manager for CRC, “The new look is more retail-friendly, yet still easily recognizable as CRC, a brand that professionals have trusted for more than half a century.”

“The labels now prominently display a product description banner which highlights the primary advantage of the product, as well as photos of key applications to help the consumer identify the right lubricant or penetrant for the job,” says Ahart. “We have also added quick response barcodes,” says Ahart. “These QR codes will help consumers access information such as videos, recommended applications, safety data sheets (SDS) and bilingual label translations. We want to give do-it-yourselfers and professionals all the product information they need, whether on the job or at the point of purchase.”

According to Ahart, “The number of smartphone users in our industry is growing rapidly. By using QR code technology, we now have the ability to make our product labels interactive and instantly provide materials that weren’t as readily available to consumers in the past. We believe the QR code adds value on the shelf and also for the professional technician who may want quick access to technical data or important product specifications.”

CRC lubricants and penetrants released in the company’s new packaging are Power Lube® Multi-Purpose Lubricant, Heavy Duty Silicone, White Lithium Grease, Ultra Screwloose® Penetrating Oil and award-winning Freeze-Off® Super Penetrant.

For more information, visit the CRC Industries website at www.crcindustries.com or view CRC product catalogs on your iPad, iPhone or Android device. Download Apple App Download Android App

“Like” CRC on Facebook at www.facebook.com/crcauto.

CRC products are available through automotive wholesale distributors and retailers. CRC trademarked brands include: CRC®, K&W®, Sta-Lube®, and Marykate®. CRC is ISO 9001:2008 certified and adheres to the strictest guidelines for quality in all facets of research, development and production.

 

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