Posts Tagged ‘aaia’

Five Tips For Staying Cool on the Road

May 31, 2017

Temperatures over 90 degrees and high humidity can challenge your vehicle’s air conditioning system. Here are some easy tips to keep you and your passengers cool on the road.

1.If possible, leave the windows down slightly on hot days to reduce heat build-up. An A/C system works by removing heat, so the cooler the interior is to start with, the easier and faster the A/C will do its job.

2.When you get in the car, open all the windows completely, or even open the doors, for a moment to vent the hot interior air quickly.

3.When you first turn the A/C on, set the controls to MAX or REC and use highest blower speed. This moves the greatest volume of air and re-circulates it for even faster cool-down. As soon as you are comfortable, switch the system to NORM or OUTSIDE or FRESH, and select a lower fan speed. The lower blower speed produces colder the air from the system.

4.Does your cool air have a bad odor, perhaps like “dirty socks” or a gym locker? Remember to set the system to the OUTSIDE air mode (not REC) frequently to help prevent or lessen this problem.

5.Automatic Temperature Control systems operate differently than manual systems. Read your owner’s manual to gain understanding of exactly how your system works. With most automatic systems, the quickest cool-down comes by setting the temperature as low as it will go at first, then adjusting it later to occupant comfort.

The Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide wants everyone to get the most comfort from their vehicle’s air conditioning system and be able to recognize problems when they occur.

Air conditioning problems should diagnosed by a professional service facility with the proper tools, training, and certified technicians.

To learn more about your vehicle’s air conditioning system, visit the Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide website at http://www.macsw.org and http://www.epa.gov/ozone/title6/609

For more free informative articles like this one available for re-distribution visit http://www.carcarenewsservice.org

Happy Fall! Time to Think About Your Coolant

September 12, 2016

It’s the beginning of fall, and time to consider your coolant.

This is a good time to think about your engine cooling system. Regular inspections and pressure tests of your cooling system are of utmost importance, as is good maintenance by following the vehicle manufacturer’s recommended coolant change intervals.

As time passes, the protective anti-corrosive additives in the antifreeze break down and lose their effectiveness. But antifreeze has two other very important jobs as well:

• It is used to decrease the temperature at which the coolant freezes.

• It is used to raise the temperature at which the coolant will begin to boil.

It is also very important that the proper ratio of water to antifreeze is always maintained. Unless specified otherwise by the vehicle manufacturer, the coolant in most vehicles should consist of a mixture of 50% water and 50% antifreeze before being added to the cooling system. This 50/50 solution not only prevents freezing, but also preserves proper cooling properties.

Also concerning the antifreeze to water mixture ratio: adding more antifreeze to the mix (once again, unless otherwise specified by the vehicle manufacturer) to increase its percentage in the mixture is not better. Generally speaking, after the ratio exceeds more than about 65% antifreeze to 35% water, freeze protection can actually diminish, but even worse, heat dissipation can radically decrease, since the water is the primary substance used for this purpose. Antifreeze itself actually has fairly poor heat transfer characteristics. Having too much antifreeze in the mixture can actually cause engine overheating.

When having your mobile A/C system professionally serviced, insist on proper repair procedures and quality replacement parts. Insist on recovery and recycling so that refrigerant can be reused and not released into the atmosphere.

You can E-mail us at macsworldwide@macsw.org or visit http://bit.ly/cf7az8 to find a Mobile Air Conditioning Society repair shop in your area. Visit http://bit.ly/9FxwTh to find out more about your car’s mobile A/C and engine cooling system.

Keep Your Cool in Hot Summer Cars

July 29, 2016

When it’s hot outside, one of the last places you want to be is sitting in traffic without a properly functioning air conditioning (A/C) system. To help avoid this uncomfortable situation, the Car Care Council recommends having your A/C system checked annually to make sure it is functioning at its peak performance level when the temperatures are soaring.

“Making sure your A/C system is working properly will give you the peace of mind knowing that your vehicle will keep you cool and safe when you hit the road this summer,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “Not only are high temperatures harmful to the body with prolonged exposure, but they can provide unnecessary wear and tear on a vehicle.”

A vehicle’s heating, ventilating and air conditioning system (HVAC) keeps the interior cabin comfortable in any season by providing the right temperature and humidity level. Typical A/C service consists of the following steps:

•Service technician visually inspects hoses, lines, seals and other components for leaks as well as inspect the drive belt for cracks or damage.

•Technician checks pressures to test operation, refrigerant charge and outlet temperatures.

•If the system is found to be low on refrigerant, a leak test is performed to find the source of the leak. Keep in mind that if your vehicle is leaking refrigerant, it is damaging the ozone layer.

•Refrigerant may be added if necessary to “top off” the system, although some states do not allow “topping off.”

•A technician may also check for evidence of refrigerant cross-contamination, which is the mixing of refrigerants.

•A/C service should also include a check of the compressor’s drive belt and tension.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For more information, visit http://www.carcare.org.

An Automotive Gift for Mother’s Day? You Bet!

April 27, 2016

It’s time to be seriously thinking about Mother’s Day. A great place to look for useful ideas is her driver’s seat, especially if Mom spends a lot of time behind the wheel.

Her vehicle is her home away from home and gifts that enhance her enjoyment of that second home are likely to be appreciated, suggests Rich White, spokesperson for the Car Care Council. “We tend to gravitate toward gifts like jewelry, a framed photo or flowers,” he says. “But why not break from the traditional and dress up her car? Maybe she’s always wanted a sunroof or a cool sound system. Her wish could come true, with the help of your local auto specialty shop or service dealer.”

White suggests that, beyond the obvious gifts such as seat covers or floor mats, Mom might appreciate having her damaged steering wheel replaced with one that’s stylish, possibly even leather covered. A sun-damaged and faded dash could be repaired, replaced, or recovered to upgrade the interior. How about a GPS navigation system, remote starter, or satellite radio?

“Security devices such as a remote keyless entry or alarm systems are also popular add-ons,” says White, “as are custom wheels or wheel covers. Most women are interested in the safety and appearance accessories as opposed to those, which are performance related. Gifts can be inexpensive. Net shopping bags, that hook on back of the driver’s seat, are great gift items too. Just look around”

Right on the heels of Mother’s Day, of course, is Father’s Day, with additional categories of gifts to consider: special tools, custom rims, window tinting, or sound system enhancements, to mention a few. “Gifts for vehicles are always well received and the variety of innovative products never stops growing” adds White.

For more ideas and prices visit your auto supply store, service dealer, or specialty shop.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” campaign, educating consumers about the benefits of regular vehicle maintenance and repair. For more information visit http://www.carcare.org.

Learn more on our website at: http://www.carcarenewsservice.org/article/automotive-gift-mothers-day-you-bet

Four Reasons Why Extended Oil Change Intervals Warrant Better Filters

March 15, 2016

The buzz around ‘extended oil change intervals’ for passenger cars and SUVs is everywhere. Some vehicle manufacturers are recommending longer oil change intervals. Oil companies are offering oils that they promote as having extended life. And motorists, pressured by the challenges of a tight economy and a hectic lifestyle, like the prospect of fewer trips to their repair shop or local quick lube to get their car’s oil changed.

But, extended oil change intervals require a filter to match – an oil filter that has the capacity and efficiency to stand up against the impact of dirt, dust and contaminants over an extended period of time.

1. Filter Capacity

The term ‘capacity,’ when used in reference to an oil filter, does not mean the amount of oil it can hold. Rather, it refers to the filter’s ability to capture and hold all the debris it is likely to encounter in its service life.

“Capacity describes the amount of contaminants an oil filter can hold before it becomes obstructed and causes the bypass valves to open,” said Kevin O’Dowd, Director of Marketing & Communications for MANN+HUMMEL Purolator Filters, supplier of high quality automotive filters to the North American aftermarket. “If this happens, the filter allows unfiltered oil to reach critical engine parts which is probably better than no oil at all, but not much,” he said.

Consider this: The longer the oil filter is in service, the more debris it is likely to be called upon to capture and hold. And, if it gets obstructed and causes the bypass valve to open, as mentioned above, and the unfiltered oil is directed to the crankshaft, engine bearings and other precision components, the result can be catastrophic.

Debris comes in from various sources. Casting flash can break off of the engine block, or even the crankshaft, connecting rods or even off of the pistons and valve train components. Sources of non-metallic debris include dust, dirt, pieces of gasket material that may get dislodged over time and even bits of hardened carbon that can build up on and then break off of valve train parts and other oil-wetted internal parts that are subjected to high temperatures. All this can add up to substantial amounts of debris over the thousands of miles between oil changes.

“So, if you are dealing with an extended oil change interval, make sure the filter you select is up to the task and has the capacity to meet the challenge,” O’Dowd said. For example Purolator’s PureONE premium oil filter will capture and safely hold 13 grams of debris before directing the bypass valve to open. And 13 grams is the equivalent of 31 standard size paper clips – a huge volume of debris by anyone’s standards.

2. Filter Efficiency

“Yet another measure of a filter’s quality is its ‘efficiency,’” said O’Dowd. Efficiency is a measure of the percentage of particles of a given size that a filter is able to capture. For example, a Purolator Classic oil filter, on average, can capture 97.5 percent of particles larger than one thousandth of an inch in diameter. And a Purolator Premium PureONE oil filter can capture, on average, 99.9 percent of these same particles. So, both types of Purolator oil filters are able to remove – efficiently – most particles that can potentially damage internal engine components.

3. Filter Construction

If an oil filter will be called upon to provide a longer service life, its materials and construction (in addition to its capacity and efficiency) also need to be able to withstand the added demands of extended service. For instance, in extended service, a filter canister will be exposed to many more high-pressure pulses from cold start-ups. So it would have to be designed to guard against fatigue failure. Furthermore, extended oil change intervals may lead to increased buildup of water and raw fuel in the oil. Again, the oil filter must be designed and built accordingly – for example, with a metal center tube as Purolator uses.

4. Filter Compatibility With Synthetic Oils

Finally, since extended oil change intervals are more likely to involve synthetic oils, it is naturally more suitable to use an oil filter designed specifically to be compatible with synthetic oils to avoid degradation of the filtering function and failure of one or more internal filter parts or valves.

The new Purolator Synthetic oil filter is custom-engineered to allow motorists to take advantage of the extended life offered by synthetic oils. Purolator Synthetic utilizes 100 percent synthetic media with pleat support technology containing wire backing to offer substantially more capacity than conventional oil filters. It can capture and hold more contaminants over the longer life of synthetic oils, without getting clogged. Its extraordinary combination of capacity, efficiency and design technology helps maintain the integrity of the media for extended periods of time. For motorists using synthetic motor oils in their vehicles, Purolator Synthetic provides 10,000-mile vehicle protection.

Therefore, according to O’Dowd, choosing a name brand supplier that has invested years of scientific research in refining its products is the best route to take to help your customers get the maximum benefits from the extended oil change intervals being touted by carmakers and oil companies.

Purolator is a proud supporter of the Automotive Aftermarket Suppliers Association’s (AASA) Know Your Parts® education and awareness campaign. This initiative promotes the importance of quality brand name aftermarket parts backed by full service suppliers to preserve the industry’s good reputation. For more information, visit: http://www.AASAKnowYourParts.org.

MANN+HUMMEL Purolator Filters manufactures and supplies high quality automotive and heavy duty filters to the North American aftermarket and original equipment manufacturers. Inventor of the automotive oil filter in 1923, Purolator has, since then, pioneered more than 40 ‘firsts’ in the filtration industry. In fact, the first automotive oil filter was called a ‘Purolator,’ short for ‘pure oil later.’ Currently, the Purolator brand has more than 2,000 part numbers for automotive, light truck and heavy-duty applications. Purolator’s advanced aftermarket filters include:

•PureONE and Purolator Classic oil filters
•Purolator Synthetic oil filters
•PureONE and Purolator Classic air filters
•BreatheEasy cabin air filters
•PowerSports oil filters
•The ‘forgotten filters,’ including transmission filters, fuel filters, breathers and PCV valves.

To learn more about Purolator filters and the filtration category, please visit http://www.purolatorautofilters.com.

To learn more about Purolator heavy duty filters, please visit http://www.PurolatorHeavyDuty.com.

To learn more about Purolator Breathe Easy cabin air filters, please visit http://www.BreatheEasycabinfilters.com

To find Purolator on Facebook, visit: http://www.facebook.com/Purolator.

To follow Purolator on Twitter, visit: http://www.twitter.com/Purolator.

The No-Fail Valentine’s Day Gift

February 8, 2016

Giving the gift of tender loving care to one’s vehicle will pay off in terms of dependability and performance this Valentine’s Day.

“When that gift translates into maintenance, motorists can expect a positive and tangible response from their vehicle in terms of dependability and performance,” said Rich White of the Car Care Council.

On the other side of the coin, consider how the car might respond if its owner had been “cheating” on it. Cheating might refer to postponing maintenance or repairs. Cheating on your vehicle may leave you stranded en route to that romantic Valentine’s Day dinner.

As with human relationships, car care is not just for special occasions and holidays. The best preventative measure is following the ongoing maintenance schedule outlined in the owner’s manual. This care helps minimize wear and catch little problems before they become big ones.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” campaign, educating consumers about the benefits of regular vehicle maintenance and repair. For more information visit http://www.carcare.org.

Car Care Tips from the Pros Will Prepare You for Winter Driving

January 18, 2016

It’s foolhardy to head out in a poorly maintained vehicle in the dead of winter, of course, but even vehicle owners in temperate zones need a car care check as the days grow shorter, note the pros with the nonprofit National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE), an independent group that tests and certifies the competence of auto technicians.

Regular, routine maintenance can help improve your gasoline mileage, reduce pollution, and catch minor problems before they become big headaches.

ASE offers these car care tips to give you peace of mind during fall and winter driving:

  • Before you do anything else, read your owner’s manual and follow the manufacturer’s recommended service schedules.
  • Get engine performance and driveability problems — hard starts, rough idling, stalling, diminished power, etc. — corrected at a reputable repair shop that employs ASE-certified repair professionals. Cold weather makes existing problems worse.
  • Replace dirty filters, such as air, fuel, and PCV. A poorly running engine is less efficient and burns more gasoline.
  • As the temperature drops below freezing, add a bottle of fuel deicer in your tank once a month to help keep moisture from freezing in the fuel line. Keeping the gas tank filled also helps prevent moisture from forming.
  • Change your oil and oil filter as specified in your manual — more often if your driving is mostly stop-and-go or consists of frequent short trips. A poll of ASE Master Auto Technicians revealed that regular oil and filter changes is one of the most frequently neglected services, yet one that is essential to protect your engine.
  • The cooling system should be flushed and refilled as recommended. The level, condition, and concentration of the coolant should be checked periodically. A 50/50 mix of antifreeze and water is usually recommended. Do-It-Yourselfers: Never remove the radiator cap until the engine has thoroughly cooled! The tightness and condition of drive belts, clamps, and hoses also should be checked regularly by a professional technician.
  • The heater and defroster must be in good working condition for passenger comfort and driver visibility.
  • Replace old blades regularly. If your climate is harsh, purchase rubber-clad (winter) blades to fight ice build-up. Stock up on windshield washer solvent — you’ll be surprised how much you use during the winter months. And don’t forget to always carry an ice scraper.
  • Have your battery checked. The only accurate way to detect a weak battery is with professional equipment. However, most motorists can perform routine care: Wear eye protection and protective rubber gloves. Scrape away corrosion from posts and cable connections; clean all surfaces; retighten all connections. If battery caps are removable, check fluid level monthly. A word of caution: Removal of cables can cause damage or loss of data/codes on some newer vehicles, so always check your owner’s manual first. Be sure to avoid contact with corrosive deposits and battery acid.
  • Inspect all lights and bulbs. Replace burned out bulbs; periodically clean road grime from all lenses. To prevent scratching, never use a dry rag. Clouded lenses can be refinished by many service outlets or by using a DIY kit found in major auto parts outlets.
  • Exhaust fumes inside your vehicle’s cabin can be deadly. Have the exhaust system examined for leaks and problems while the vehicle is on a lift. The trunk and floorboards should also be inspected for small holes.
  • Worn tires are dangerous in winter weather. Examine tires for remaining tread life, uneven wearing, and cupping; check the sidewalls for cuts and nicks. Check tire pressure once a month, letting the tires “cool down” before checking the pressure. Rotate as recommended. Don’t forget to check your spare, and be sure the jack is in good working condition. Under-inflated tires or poorly aligned wheels makes your engine work harder and thus use excess gasoline.
  • Have your brakes checked periodically for safety and to prevent costly repairs that can be caused by neglect.
  • The transmission is often neglected until a major failure. Routine checks and fluid changes at prescribed intervals can prevent very costly repairs down the line.
  • Always carry an emergency kit with you: extra gloves, boots and blankets; flares; a small shovel and sand or kitty litter; tire chains; a flashlight and extra batteries; and a cell phone and extra car charger. Put a few “high-energy” snacks in your glove box.

The National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) was founded in 1972 as a nonprofit, independent organization dedicated to improving the quality of automotive service and repair through the voluntary testing and certification of automotive technicians. ASE-certified technicians wear blue and white ASE shoulder insignia and carry credentials listing their exact area(s) of certification. Their employers often display the blue and white ASE sign.

For more information, including seasonal car care tips, visit http://www.ase.com.

Vehicle Safety Items Make Perfect Holiday Gifts

December 8, 2015

It’s crunch time and if you’re still struggling with what to give a loved one, family member or friend this holiday season, the perfect gift can be an item related to vehicle safety. Tire pressure gauges, ice scrapers, emergency kits, windshield wipers or the consumer Car Care Guide, published by the Car Care Council, are suitable items for any drivers on your list.

“These small and relatively inexpensive items play a big role in vehicle safety and reliability especially during winter driving when road conditions can be hazardous and unpredictable,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “They’re a perfect stocking-stuffer or holiday gift that shows the drivers on your list that you truly care about them this holiday season.”

Low tire pressure and windshield wipers were among the top six items that had the highest failure rate during National Car Care Month check-up events. Tire pressure should be checked at least once a month as properly inflated tires are critical to the vehicle’s ride, handling, traction and safety. For optimum performance, wiper blades should be replaced every six months or when cracked, cut, torn, streaking or chattering.

An emergency road kit is something that can be easily compiled or purchased. A kit should include an ice scraper and snow brush, jumper cables, flashlight, flares, blanket, candles/matches, bottled water and dry food snacks.

The council’s Car Care Guide is a glove-box size consumer booklet that presents automotive maintenance and repair in everyday language. Single copies of the guide are available at no cost on the Car Care Council Web site at http://www.carcare.org.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers.

Taking the Scare Out of Driving on Halloween

October 21, 2015

Driving on Halloween can be frightening for motorists, especially when little “ghouls” and “goblins” – out after dark and full of excitement – forget road safety rules or wear costumes or masks that limit their vision. To help ensure safety on a night reserved for fun, the Car Care Council reminds motorists to drive slowly, be extra careful when entering or exiting driveways or alleyways, and make sure the vehicle’s brake system works properly.

The vehicle’s brake system is its most critical safety item but brakes wear out and eventually need replacement. The factors that affect wear are driving habits, operating conditions, vehicle type and the quality of the brake lining material. Symptoms of brake problems include the following:

  • The car pulls to one side during braking;
  • The brake pedal pulsates when the brakes are applied;
  • The brake pedal feels “mushy;”
  • There is a noise when stepping on the brake pedal; and
  • There is a repeated need to add brake fluid to the master cylinder.

Drivers should also check the windshield wipers and windshield fluid, as well as the vehicle’s lights for maximum performance and visibility on Halloween.

Parents and adults should remind their trick-or-treaters to get out of cars on the curb side and not the traffic side, to stop at all corners and to use crosswalks. Children should look left, right and left again before crossing, stay on sidewalks, avoid crossing through yards and wear bright, reflective and flame retardant clothing.

“We can help keep young pedestrians safe on Halloween by checking the vehicle’s safety items, reminding children of basic safety rules and taking extra precautions when driving through neighborhoods,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For more information or to receive a copy of the council’s new Car Care Guide for motorists, visit www.carcare.org.

Does Your Car Make the Grade?

August 27, 2015

As the end of summer nears, students are getting ready to head back to school. Whether it’s driving to college or carpooling with other neighborhood families, a properly maintained car is the safest, most dependable way to go.

“When your passengers are your children and their classmates, making sure your car gets more than a passing grade is extra important,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “A preventive maintenance check-up and having any repairs performed will give parents peace of mind as their children travel to and from school.”

To make sure your car gets high marks for safety and dependability, the Car Care Council recommends a 21st century tune-up be performed to make sure the following systems are in proper working order: battery, charging and starting; engine mechanical; power train control; fuel; ignition; and emissions.

In addition, the following items should be in peak condition for car pool season: tires and tire pressure; brakes; hoses and belts; air filters; wipers; exterior and interior lighting; and fluid levels, including engine oil, power steering, transmission, brake, windshield washer solvent and antifreeze/coolant.

The Car Care Council also suggests that all vehicles have a roadside emergency kit on-hand that includes items such as flares, a first aid kit, a tire-changing jack, a tire pressure gauge, jumper cables and a blanket. In addition, important telephone numbers should be stored in the glove box or cell phone in case of a breakdown or emergency.

About the Car Care Council:

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For a copy of the council’s Car Care Guide or for more information, visit http://www.carcare.org.